Dallas School District #2

The Dallas High School Sports Marketing class, Leadership class, and Cheer Team have teamed up with the Susan G Komen Foundation to help spread awareness and support for breast cancer. Dallas High School has been selected among Willamette Valley schools to represent the Breast Cancer foundation this year.

As October is Breast Cancer awareness month, they are selling “Fight Like a Girl” shirts for students, staff and anyone else who would be willing to support this cause. It is also a great opportunity to come represent at our “Pink Out” games next month.

All proceeds will go to the Susan Komen foundation to help local breast cancer survivors and their battle.

In 1980, Nancy G. Brinker promised her dying sister, Susan, that she would do everything in her power to end breast cancer forever. In 1982, that promise became the Susan G. Komen organization and the beginning of a global movement. What was started with $200 and a shoebox full of potential donor names has now grown into the world’s largest nonprofit source of funding for the fight against breast cancer. To date, they have invested more than $2.9 billion in groundbreaking research, community health outreach, advocacy and programs in more than 60 countries. Their efforts helped reduce deaths from breast cancer by 38 percent between 1989 to 2014 and they won’t stop until their promise is fulfilled.

Susan G. Komen has transformed how the world treats and talks about this disease and have mobilized the largest and most passionate community. Since 1982, they have funded more than $988 million in research, more than $2.2 billion in education, screening, and treatment, serving millions worldwide.

The combination of science, education and direct help to people facing breast cancer has led to a 39 percent decline in mortality since 1989. Komen has funded more breast cancer research over their history than any other nonprofit to date. Komen focuses on supporting those with the fewest resources; uninsured, under-insured and low-income women and men unable to access care. Komen and grantees educate people about breast cancer where they live, work, play, and pray to empower them with information they need to make informed breast care decisions for themselves and as they advocate for others.

To order a shirt, please use the following link: https://dallaspinkpromo.itemorder.com

Chamber Luncheon: Dino Venti

Good, clean food is Venti Restaurants commitment to finding the best ingredients – locally and regionally sourced and raised with respect for the environment, animals and farmers – to serve to you. “Their community.” As a family-owned restaurant, they understand the importance of quality ingredients. For two decades they have striven to fill your plates with all-natural products.

The utilization of a farm-to-table concept with their produce allows Venti to offer products rich in nutrients and all the natural benefits of fresh products from hard working people here in our community. Their proteins are carefully selected with diligence and understanding of the necessity of freshness and cleanliness. The seafood found at Ventis is the highest of quality and all wild caught from the Pacific Northwest. They make an effort to accommodate dietary needs and the pursuit of healthy products by offering many gluten free friendly, vegetarian, and vegan options. They accomplish this by creating and producing many of their products with fresh ingredients in their facilities. This process allows them to eliminate chemicals, additives, preservatives, hormones, GMOs, MSG and potentially harmful products from our food.

Venti moved from their original location in the Reed Opera House in the summer of 2008. Their downtown Salem location is bigger and allows for a full kitchen and a full basement bar. They like to say they “crossed the road.”

While they serve lots of meatless and gluten free options, chicken teriyaki is the core of their offerings – the original rice bowl at the Reed Opera House was served with skewered chicken. By Dino Venit’s account, he has prepped 50 tons of chicken. In honor of the feat they redesigned their logo to pay homage to the chicken. The rooster logo is a nod to the animal loved for its power, boldness and beauty.

Venti’s strives to carry unique micro-brews and ciders. The local beer-drinking crowd is enthusiastic and often gets to help select the next keg. Venti’s opt for Oregon and North West brews but occasionally throw something different out there.

Dino Venti, owner of Venti Restaurants, will be speaking at this month’s Chamber Luncheon on September 17th. Don’t miss as he discusses the secret to his restaurants success in our local area. Chamber Luncheon is held at Dallas Retirement Village, and doors will open at 11:45 am. We hope to see you there.

Dallas Rotary Club

Dallas Rotary Club is more than a service organization that’s making a difference in your community. They are an international membership organization made up of people who share a passion for and commitment to enhancing communities and improving lives across the world. The difference they make starts with their members.

With more than 1.2 million members in clubs in almost every country, they are improving communities around the world. As a member of Rotary, they have opportunities to change lives locally and to connect with other clubs to work on international projects that address today’s most pressing humanitarian challenges, including fighting disease, providing clean water, supporting education, and promoting peace.

Their largest and proudest effort to date is their work to eradicate polio. They initiated the audacious polio eradication campaign in 1979, by vaccinating children in the Philippines. With the help of their partners, they have since reduced polio cases worldwide by 99.9 percent.

They are problem solvers working together to achieve a better world. Their members are deeply ingrained in the communities in which they live and serve, affording them insight into local challenges and access to the leaders, resources, and networking opportunities needed to strategize and take action to make lasting change.

As Rotary members they hold themselves to the highest ethical standards. Community members, community leaders, and other organizations see them out because they know they can trust the Dallas Rotary to be effective partners and deliver on their promises.

Rotary clubs reflect the diversity of their communities and the breadth of viewpoints that comes from their members’ varied professional and personal experiences. For more than 100 years, they have been applying different perspectives to create innovative, sustainable solutions that address the needs and challenges affecting their communities.

Harnessing their unique perspectives and ideas gives the Dallas Rotary Club a shared purpose – one that compels them to take action. They roll up their sleeves, leverage their personal relationships with local partners and businesses, and apply their leadership skill as a way to get the job done and bring to life the changes they envision.

The impact their members make takes shape at Rotary club meetings and activities. These gatherings allow you to join other passionate, visionary women and men regularly to discuss and act upon community needs. Rotary club meetings are also a place to strengthen connections to friends and neighbors and form meaningful relationships that last a lifetime.

Just a Rotary helps you invest in your community, it gives you an opportunity to invest in yourself. Many clubs offer continuous learning opportunities, with a broad range of workshops, conferences, guest speakers, and more – all aimed at helping you grow personally and professionally.

Connect with a Rotary Club today. Rotary members join clubs by invitation. With 35,000 clubs around the world, and others that meet online, Rotary makes it easy to get involved and start making a difference today. Be a part of the Rotary difference. Bring your passion, your perspective, and your purpose to Rotary. To connect with a club in your area and learn more, visit them at www.rotary.org/join.

The 10 Don’ts of Networking

Don’t dress down. Looks matter, whether you like it or not. Before you can “wow” people with your impressive set of skills, you’ll need to awe them with your appearance and body language.

Don’t dismiss people who don’t look important. “You should behave here like everyone you interact with has the potential… to get you a cover story in The New York Times.” Sometimes it’s the secretary that will get the job done, not the president.

Don’t expect a job. Getting a job might be more about who you know than what you know – but don’t be so obvious about it.

Don’t be uninformed. No card, no contact. Be up to date with what is going on in your field and in the field whose business you are trying to get. It’s okay to learn something new, but if you don’t know something crucial then you have just lost their faith in your abilities.

Don’t collect business cards like candy. “Don’t trick-or-treat for business cards.” Make an honest connection with someone before you start soliciting for business. They are more likely to give it after a positive interaction verses a cold call.

Don’t only think about yourself. “Networking can be described as the process of interacting or engaging in communication with other for mutual assistance or support.”

Don’t be vague. “I want to go back to school… maybe do something in the business world.” Almost everything has something to do with business. Have clear goals in mind.

Don’t reach too high. Having Mark Cuban, Warren Buffet, or John Maxwell on speed dial would be great – for you. But would you really be able to offer them much help? Maybe… but probably not.

Don’t monopolize anyone’s time. This isn’t a phone call or an email exchange, so give people space to mingle. If they are giving hand signals to a partner across the room to help them escape, you’ve lost the opportunity.

Don’t follow up with a sales pitch. Before you ask for a favor, you need to develop the relationship further, Sue Clement writes on Businessknowhow.com. She recommends referencing something you spoke about at the networking event and then offering the person something they can use – whether that is an introduction or a helpful article.

Child Care Resources & Referral

Child Care Resource and Referral strives to strengthen our community by supporting early childhood professionals, providing leadership in the field and by promoting access to high quality child care experiences for all children and families inclusive of every race, ethnicity, language, gender, age, ability or income level.

Every child and family should have access to high quality, culturally relevant child care and all early learning teachers inclusive of every race, ethnicity, language, gender, age, ability or income level should be professionals earning a fair and sustainable wage with access to high quality professional development, support and resources. This is the vision that Child Care Resource and Referral strives towards.

Child Care Resource and Referral provides opportunities for educators and child care providers to expand on their knowledge, as well as support in starting and running a child care business. They inform providers about the current licensing requirements specific to the field that they are in, and connect them with ways to meet those regulations. Newsletters geared towards educators and providers are released quarterly. These newsletters are full of information like changes in class prices, regulations, upcoming conferences, funding resources, and also includes fun things to do with the children such as themed songs or activities.

For families searching for reliable and safe child care CCR&R provides information not only to put you in contact with local child care providers, but what to look for from these providers. They want to ensure that families are finding the best fit for their needs and with a simple table are able to break down what kind there are, and how that translates over with safety regulations. In an effort to provide safe child care fore everyone they even provide a resource link to help in paying for a child care provider.

Child Care Resources and Referral would not be able to provide this assistance and education to the community without the help of their trainers. Their website is full of information about how to become a trainer with Child Care Resources and Referral, training resources to continue their education, and events for trainers to participate and connect with other trainers.

Child Care Resources and Referral knows how important it is to parts that our children are safe, and in the best care possible while we are at work. They continue to strive endlessly to provide everyone with the information needed to make a wise decision, and with the abilities to provide a safe environment for our children. As a parent, I thank you for your hard work.

Book Review – The 5 Levels of Leadership

From where I’m sitting we’re all leaders, in different capacities.  With that in mind, we can all use a boost in how we go about leading in our realm.  Many of us have at least heard of leadership guru John C. Maxwell.  In fact for many people when they think of information about becoming a good leader, they think of things that Maxwell has said or written.  Not sounding familiar?  That’s ok.  I’d like to introduce you to him and one of my favorite books he’s written.  “The 5 Levels of Leadership”.

In this book, Maxwell dispels the myth that position or title equals leadership.  True leaders are those who stand for something great and do things in line with a greater cause.  Maxwell shares that the five levels include:

  1. Position – People follow because they have to. You’ve been given a title that says you’re the boss.
  2. Permission – People follow because they want to. People have enough buy-in on you as leader they voluntarily go where you lead them.
  3. Production – People follow because of what you have done for the organization. Your actions have proven to your followers that you are worth following.
  4. People Development – People follow because of what you have done for them personally. You’ve put enough into developing others that people value your leadership as a developer of people as well as processes.
  5. Personhood – People follow because of who you are and what you represent. Your character has stood the test of time and has been refined like gold and has proven to be of high value.

Consider this book for your next investment into your business library.  For me, it showed me the level of leader I am now and what I’m capable of becoming.  For you maybe something else.  But there’s something there for sure to get that boost to reaching new potential in leadership capabilities.